Welcome to the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association

Join PAESTA!

We are the Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA), whose mission is to facilitate and advance excellence in Earth and Space Science education.

Become a member and share your ideas, vision and energy – join PAESTA today! Membership is free and open to any educator or supporter of Earth and Space science education from Pennsylvania or outside the state.


Kathy Tait and Judy Treichler

Award for Teaching Excellence - 2015

For her sustained professional and personal dedication to her students, her peers, and the Earth and space science teaching profession as a whole, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association congratulates Judy Treichler as our 2015 Teaching Excellence Award recipient. Congratulations, Judy

News from PAESTA

2016 Teacher Appreciation Week - a message from the National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation

During Teacher Appreciation Week, the National Science Foundation wants to acknowledge and celebrate the amazing commitment and profound work of STEM teachers across grades preK-12. Attached is a letter from the Assistant Director of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation, Joan Ferrini-Mundy, who is taking the time to recognize the wonderful pool of dedicated STEM teachers we have here in Pennsylvania and across the United States.

 

2016 Shale Network Workshop and Continuing Ed Credits, May 19-20

The 2016 Shale Network Workshop will take place at the Atherton Hotel in State College, PA, on May 19th - 20th. This year, the theme is "Science and cooperation around water quality data and legacy wells in shale gas basins."

The tentative agenda and workshop details are available at: http://www.shalenetwork.org/content/2016-shale-network-workshop-0

The Flint Water Crisis – What is happening, and what are the consequences? - PAESTA Podcast Series: Episode 7

You Asked, We Answered!

Trascript for the podcast

Hello my name is James Clark and I am an undergraduate student at Penn State Brandywine. In this podcast, I will be answering the following questions that pertain to the Flint water crisis. Who is to blame?  What caused the Flint water crisis?  Was the Flint water crisis preventable?  What are the lasting consequences?  What are the political ramifications? Along with these questions, I will also answer some common questions that people are asking about the Flint water crisis.

Science in the News

EARTH Magazine: Reading the Ridges - Are Climate and the Seafloor Connected?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 2, 2016  --  EARTH Magazine plunges into the depths of the ocean with scientists seeking whether Earth's climate and sea-level history are intrinsically linked with tectonics at mid-ocean ridges. Since these ridges are not as well studied as terrestrial volcanoes, largely given the challenge to access them, teams of researchers are using tectonic models, evidence from high-resolution mapping of different spreading ridges and sediment cores to examine the evidence. 

NSF: Researchers find that Earth may be home to 1 trillion species

National Science Foundation

From NSF, May 2, 2016  --  Largest analysis of microbial data reveals that 99.999 percent of all species remain undiscovered

Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to the results of a new study.

The estimate, based on universal scaling laws applied to large datasets, appears today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The report's authors are Jay Lennon and Kenneth Locey of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

Listen Current: Batteries for Your House

Listen Current

From Listen Current, April 28, 2016  --  Outside Reno, Nevada, the company Tesla is constructing a giant battery factory. The batteries will be made for the company’s electric cars as well as other things. Known as the Gigafactory, the building will allow the company to scale up battery production and reduce the price of their electric cars. Tesla is planning to revolutionize energy use by producing something new in their Gigafactory: a “Powerwall,” or a battery for the home.

Science Nation: Fertilizing sustainable growth in the forest industry

Science Nation

From NSF, March 28, 2016  --  Researchers partner with industry and government to make commercially grown forests more productive without sacrificing the environment

As money-makers, trees stand tall. The U.S. forest industry is an economic powerhouse. Southern states alone grow more commercial wood than any country in the world.

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.0 Vanuatu

IRIS

April 28, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.0 earthquake in the southwest Pacific Ocean at a depth of 27 km beneath the island of Melampa in the Vanuatu island chain.

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/4113

EARTH Magazine: Making Tracks Through the Dinosaur Diamond

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/26/2016  --  Between Utah and Colorado, there is a geographical diamond in which lies a rich collection of fossils and dinosaur footprints recording the history of when dinosaurs inhabited this region. All major ages of dinosaur life are recorded here, and for more than a hundred years, paleontologists have busily been debating which dinosaurs existed based on bones and abundant dinosaur tracks, the latter of which provide clues that allow geoscientists to interpret dinosaur daily life. 

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.8 Ecuador

IRIS

April 16, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.8 earthquake that occurred near the coast of Ecuador. According to a statement from the government, more than 1,550 people were injured, 235 dead, at least 370 buildings were destroyed and another 151 buildings and 26 schools were affected by the quake.