Welcome to the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association

Join PAESTA!

We are the Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA), whose mission is to facilitate and advance excellence in Earth and Space Science education.

Become a member and share your ideas, vision and energy – join PAESTA today! Membership is free and open to any educator or supporter of Earth and Space science education from Pennsylvania or outside the state.


Kathy Tait and Judy Treichler

Award for Teaching Excellence - 2015

For her sustained professional and personal dedication to her students, her peers, and the Earth and space science teaching profession as a whole, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association congratulates Judy Treichler as our 2015 Teaching Excellence Award recipient. Congratulations, Judy


2015 PAESTA Conference Information

Presentations from the Conference are currently being posted. For more information see the 2015 PAESTA Conference Information page.


 

 

News from PAESTA

January 2016 Edition of the Pennsylvania Observer (PA weather/climate information)

From The Pennsylvania Climate Office Staff  -- The January 2016 edition of the "Pennsylvania Observer" is attached.  Features include a summary of January's weather, the experimental forecast for February and March, and one highlight. The highlight covers the basics of understanding two teleconnection patterns - the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation.

2016 Summer Research Experiences for STEM Teachers

Application deadline: March 6, 2016

Program dates: June 20, 2016- August 5, 2016

CSATS Summer Research Experiences for STEM Teachers actively involve K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math educators working alongside university or industry scientists and engineers on cutting-edge research and integrating related research projects into their classrooms, schools and districts.  

Earth Science Week 2016 Theme Announced: 'Our Shared Geoheritage'

Earth Science Week

From AGI, 01/14/2016  --  The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to announce that the theme of Earth Science Week 2016 is "Our Shared Geoheritage." This year's event will promote awareness of the many ways that science helps us understand, appreciate, and make the most of our geoscience heritage, or, as it is commonly known worldwide, "geoheritage."

Science in the News

EARTH Magazine: Permian-Triassic Extinctions Timed Differently on Land and at Sea

From EARTH Magazine, 02/04/2016  -- The largest mass extinction - on land or sea - occurred some 252 million years ago at the end of the Permian Period. Generally attributed to extensive flood basalt volcanism in Siberia, the extinction event nearly eradicated life on Earth. New research looking at rocks associated with the terrestrial extinction suggests that the terrestrial extinction started prior to the marine extinction. If true,  Siberian volcanism alone could not account for the extinctions. 

EARTH Magazine: How to Feed 11 Billion People

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 01/26/2016  --  The challenge of feeding our planet's growing population is one of critical importance - it will perhaps be the most important challenge of the 21st century. As the human population continues to rise, geoscience is informimg experts, suggesting major shifts in agriculture must be taken to prevent rampant food insecurity by the year 2050.

Listen Current: Tainted Water

Listen Current

From Listen Current, 01/25/2016  --  For more than a year, Flint Michigan’s tap water has been unsafe to drink. The problem started in 2014 when the city decided to switch the drinking water supply to the Flint River to save money. This water damaged the pipes and lead seeped into the drinking water. But the state ignored complaints about the smell and taste of the water. It wasn’t until January 2015 that the governor of Michigan declared a state of emergency because of the high lead levels in the water.

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.1 Southern Alaska

IRIS

01/24/2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.1 earthquake that knocked items off shelves and walls in Alaska early Sunday. The earthquake was widely felt because it was close to Alaska’s population centers. There were no reports of injuries, but four homes were lost to natural gas explosions or fire following the earthquake.

EARTH Magazine: Lake Sediments Suggest Mild Volcanic Winter After Massive Toba Eruption

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 01/15/2016  -- Toba volcano erupted 74,000 years ago, and is thought to have been the largest eruption in the last 2.5 million years. Some scientists have thought the fallout from the eruption caused a volcanic winter so catastrophic it almost drove humans to extinction. A new high-resolution study of lake sediments from East Africa disputes that idea, however, suggesting that the early humans in the area probably experienced little or no cooling following the massive eruption.

EARTH Magazine: The Snowmastodon Project - Mammoths and Mastodons Lived the High Life in Colorado

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  While expanding a reservoir in Snowmass Village, Colorado, workers stumbled upon a big bone. And then another, and another, and another. Realizing they found something special, the workers called in the experts at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS), who drove several hours to examine the site. Scientists quickly realized that this was no ordinary boneyard. Work on the reservoir halted, as DMNS scientists called in dozens of volunteers and experts from around the country to help excavate the site before construction continued.