Welcome to the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association

Join PAESTA!

We are the Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA), whose mission is to facilitate and advance excellence in Earth and Space Science education.

Become a member and share your ideas, vision and energy – join PAESTA today! Membership is free and open to any educator or supporter of Earth and Space science education from Pennsylvania or outside the state.


Kathy Tait and Judy Treichler

Award for Teaching Excellence - 2015

For her sustained professional and personal dedication to her students, her peers, and the Earth and space science teaching profession as a whole, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association congratulates Judy Treichler as our 2015 Teaching Excellence Award recipient. Congratulations, Judy

News from PAESTA

World Space Week 2016

World Space Week

Join educators and space enthusiasts around the world to celebrate the United Nations-declared World Space Week, Oct. 4-10, 2016. This international event commemorates the beginning of the Space Age with the launch of Sputnik 1 on Oct. 4, 1957.

World Space Week is the largest public space event in the world, with celebrations in more than 70 nations. During World Space Week, teachers are encouraged to use space-themed activities to excite students about science and technology.

Opportunities at the Independence Seaport Museum

Independence Seaport Museum

A message from our friends at the Independence Seaport Museum  --  At Independence Seaport Museum, water is the unifying thread, bridging the Museum’s National Historic Landmark ships with exhibitions and programs that let visitors discover the science, history and culture of our waterways. Featuring such popular educational programming as Deep Sea Science, Sound Under the Sea, Ecological Stowaways, and Ecology of the Delaware, a field trip to Independence Seaport Museum is perfect for all ages!

Geoscience Currents #111: Total Employment in the Geosciences, 2014

American Geosciences Institute

With the Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2016 publication due out shortly, AGI is sharing a change to their interpretation of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data in order to estimate the size of the geoscience workforce in the United States.  The updated count of geoscientists in the workforce in 2014 includes the BLS counts of atmospheric sciences, earth sciences, marine sciences, space sciences, environmental sciences, and geography postsecondary teachers.  AGI is projecting a 10% increase in the number of employed geoscientists over the next decade.

Science in the News

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.4 South Georgia Island Region

IRIS

August 19, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.4 earthquake occurred in the South Georgia Island Region.  South Georgia Island is a British territory in the South Atlantic Ocean that lies about 800 miles east of the Falkland Islands.  It is a remote and inhospitable island.. 

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/4206

Press release for students - Fire clues in cave dripwater

Planet Press

From EGU, July 21, 2016  --  Researchers in Australia and the UK have found that stalagmites and stalactites can be used to help trace past wildfires that burned above the cave. Fires change the chemistry of the water above ground, and these subtle changes leave traces in the stalactites and stalagmites that form when the water drips in the caves underground.

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.2 New Caledonia

IRIS

August 12, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a major earthquake that struck in the southwest Pacific Ocean 515.8 km (320.5 mi) southeast of Vanuatu. There were no reports of damage and no threat of a tsunami.

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/4204

EARTH: Sand Shouldn't Stand In for Volcanic Ash in Jet Engine Tests

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, August 10, 2016  --  In 2010, trans-Atlantic airspace was shutdown, and international travel halted, when Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull erupted, spewing ash into the air. This was an expensive decision, triggered by the threat ash posed to aircraft, crews and passengers. When ash enters an aircraft turbine, which typically can reach temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Celsius, the ash can melt, damaging the engines in midflight. 

EARTH Magazine: EARTH: Bringing Geoscience to Bear on the Problem of Abandoned Mines

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 30, 2016  --  Last summer, while the abandoned Gold King Mine in Colorado was being studied for acid mine drainage, the earthen plug blew out, releasing millions of gallons of acid mine water into the Animas River, which eventually drains into the San Juan and Colorado rivers and ultimately Lake Powell. The images were startling, but this event added momentum to the national dialog on remediating abandoned mine lands. EARTH Magazine explores the role geoscience plays in this process. 

Press release for students - Half a degree makes a world of difference

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, April 21, 2016  --  The climate of our planet is changing, and the Earth is warming up. World leaders have discussed whether we should limit the average temperature increase in our planet to 1.5°C or 2°C. There’s only half a degree of difference between these two temperature limits, but scientists have now discovered that they would each have very different consequences for our planet.