Welcome to the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association

Join PAESTA!

We are the Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA), whose mission is to facilitate and advance excellence in Earth and Space Science education.

Become a member and share your ideas, vision and energy – join PAESTA today! Membership is free and open to any educator or supporter of Earth and Space science education from Pennsylvania or outside the state.


Kathy Tait and Judy Treichler

Award for Teaching Excellence - 2015

For her sustained professional and personal dedication to her students, her peers, and the Earth and space science teaching profession as a whole, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association congratulates Judy Treichler as our 2015 Teaching Excellence Award recipient. Congratulations, Judy

News from PAESTA

2016 Teacher Appreciation Week - a message from the National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation

During Teacher Appreciation Week, the National Science Foundation wants to acknowledge and celebrate the amazing commitment and profound work of STEM teachers across grades preK-12. Attached is a letter from the Assistant Director of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation, Joan Ferrini-Mundy, who is taking the time to recognize the wonderful pool of dedicated STEM teachers we have here in Pennsylvania and across the United States.

 

2016 Shale Network Workshop and Continuing Ed Credits, May 19-20

The 2016 Shale Network Workshop will take place at the Atherton Hotel in State College, PA, on May 19th - 20th. This year, the theme is "Science and cooperation around water quality data and legacy wells in shale gas basins."

The tentative agenda and workshop details are available at: http://www.shalenetwork.org/content/2016-shale-network-workshop-0

The Flint Water Crisis – What is happening, and what are the consequences? - PAESTA Podcast Series: Episode 7

You Asked, We Answered!

Trascript for the podcast

Hello my name is James Clark and I am an undergraduate student at Penn State Brandywine. In this podcast, I will be answering the following questions that pertain to the Flint water crisis. Who is to blame?  What caused the Flint water crisis?  Was the Flint water crisis preventable?  What are the lasting consequences?  What are the political ramifications? Along with these questions, I will also answer some common questions that people are asking about the Flint water crisis.

Science in the News

EARTH Magazine: The Most Dangerous Fault in America

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 05/23/2016  --  When people think of dangerous faults in America, the the San Andreas probably comes to mind first. But another potentially greater threat lurks in the East Bay region of Northern California, just a stone's throw from San Francisco and the tech hub of Silicon Valley: the Hayward Fault. In the June issue, EARTH Magazine guest author Steven Newton lays out just what is at risk, and what to expect when an earthquake strikes on what may be the most dangerous fault in America.

EARTH Magazine: Did the Medieval Warm Period Welcome Vikings to Greenland?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 16, 2016  --  What is known: Vikings sailed to Greenland. They homesteaded there for a few hundred years, and likely experienced multiple famines. Many died. Some returned to European shores. And all of this happened during a time in Europe known to geoscientists as the Medieval Warm Period. The warmer, milder conditions that defined this time eventually ended too. 

Listen Current: Nepal Earthquake a Year Later

Listen Current

From Listen Current, May 10, 2016  --  The Himalayan country of Nepal was rocked by a devastating earthquake that killed almost 9,000 people one year ago. Today, the country still suffers from widespread homelessness, power outages and a serious lack of basic supplies. Even with the large amounts of money pledged to Nepal, none of that money actually arrived to help the people. Monsoon season is approaching and the people need more secure living situations in order to survive. Listen to hear more about the conditions in Nepal after the earthquake.

Press release for students - Studying glaciers with animated satellite images

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, November 26, 2015  --  Frank Paul, a scientist from the University of Zurich in Switzerland, has come up with a simple method to allow us to see glacier movements and changes, using the Karakoram mountain range in central Asia as an example. He created GIF animations from satellite images of the region.