Welcome to the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association

Join PAESTA!

We are the Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA), whose mission is to facilitate and advance excellence in Earth and Space Science education.

Become a member and share your ideas, vision and energy – join PAESTA today! Membership is free and open to any educator or supporter of Earth and Space science education from Pennsylvania or outside the state.

News from PAESTA

May 2015 PAESTAR

This month we recognize Isabel Pilling, science teacher at AMY James Martin in Philadelphia, for her work as a Board Member for the GreenTreks Network.  GreenTreks is a non-profit video production and educational organization that highlights environmental solutions to inspire actions within the Philadelphia community and beyond.  Isabel has been a math and science teacher to students in grades 6 to 10 for over 15 years in the School District of Philadelphia, inspiring audiences young and old to get involved and make a difference.

Pennsylvania Geographical Society Teacher Recognition Award

Pennsylvania Geographical Society

The Pennsylvania Geographical Society (PGS) Awards Committee is soliciting nominations and self-nominations for the following 2015 award:

Teacher Recognition Award.  Given to K-12 teachers who are effective at teaching Geography, Earth Science, Environmental Science or other courses such as Social Studies where a significant geographic component is present.  More than one award is given each year, and recipients need not be members of PGS.

Nominations or self-nominations should be sent to: 

Science in the News

EARTH Magazine: Rock Stars - Geologists on the Silver Screen

EARTH magazine

From EARTH magazine, 05/27/15  --  As this summer's blockbuster movie season gets underway, EARTH Magazine asks an important question: In movies, "are geologists portrayed as heroes or villains?" The topic of how geologists are portrayed in film has been oft-debated around a campfire, or over a frosty beverage at the end of a day of fieldwork, but now four scientists bring some serious analysis to the subject in the June issue feature, "Rock Stars - Geologists on the Silver Screen."

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.3 Nepal on 05/12/15

IRIS

05/07/15  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on this powerful magnitude 7.3 earthquake that occurred near Mount Everest. Early reports suggest 32 people have been killed and at least 1,000 were injured in the earthquake. The region is still in recovery from a 7.8 magnitude earthquake that occurred on April 25, killing more than 8,000 people.

EARTH Magazine: Amber-Encased Specimen Could Be Oldest Known Grass

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 05/15/15  --  The evolutionary age of grass has been hotly contested. Scientists have previously dated the earliest grasses to 55 million years ago; after the dinosaurs went extinct. Now, a new 100-million-year-old specimen of amber from Myanmar potentially pushes back grass evolution to the Late Cretaceous. 

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.1 Papua New Guinea on 05/07/15

IRIS

05/07/15  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on this powerful magnitude 7.1 earthquake that hit off the western coast of Bougainville Island on Thursday, approximately 144 km (89 mi) southwest of Panguna. There were no immediate reports of damages or casualties.

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/3394

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea on 05/05/15

IRIS

05/05/15  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on this powerful magnitude 7.5 earthquake that struck off the eastern coast of Papua New Guinea on Tuesday, approximately 130 km (81 mi) south-southwest of Kokopo at a depth of 42 km (26.1 mi). 

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/3382