EARTH: Solar Storms Cause Spike in Insurance Claims

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  On March 13, 1989, a geomagnetic storm spawned by a solar outburst struck Earth, triggering instabilities in the electric-power grid that serves much of eastern Canada and the U.S. The storm led to blackouts for more than 6 million customers and caused tens of millions of dollars in damages and economic losses. More than 25 years later, the possibility of another such catastrophe still looms, and the day-to-day effects of space weather on electrical systems remain difficult to quantify. Now, a new study correlating electrical insurance claims with geomagnetic data suggests that even moderate space weather may play a significant role in destabilizing the power grid.

Read more about the striking correlation between solar storms and financial losses in the November issue of EARTH magazine.

For more stories about the science of our planet, check out EARTH magazine online or subscribe at www.earthmagazine.org. The November issue, now available on the digital newsstand, features an update on our moon's violent birth and turbulent infancy coming from a quartet of new research papers, an invitation to explore the incredible scenery and geology of Bali, and an interview with Sarah Anzick, a molecular biologist who sequenced DNA from infant remains found in the only-known Clovis burial site — which was discovered on her family’s Montana ranch, plus much, much more.