In the News

NSF: Researchers find that Earth may be home to 1 trillion species

National Science Foundation

From NSF, May 2, 2016  --  Largest analysis of microbial data reveals that 99.999 percent of all species remain undiscovered

Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to the results of a new study.

The estimate, based on universal scaling laws applied to large datasets, appears today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The report's authors are Jay Lennon and Kenneth Locey of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

Listen Current: Batteries for Your House

Listen Current

From Listen Current, April 28, 2016  --  Outside Reno, Nevada, the company Tesla is constructing a giant battery factory. The batteries will be made for the company’s electric cars as well as other things. Known as the Gigafactory, the building will allow the company to scale up battery production and reduce the price of their electric cars. Tesla is planning to revolutionize energy use by producing something new in their Gigafactory: a “Powerwall,” or a battery for the home.

Science Nation: Fertilizing sustainable growth in the forest industry

Science Nation

From NSF, March 28, 2016  --  Researchers partner with industry and government to make commercially grown forests more productive without sacrificing the environment

As money-makers, trees stand tall. The U.S. forest industry is an economic powerhouse. Southern states alone grow more commercial wood than any country in the world.

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.0 Vanuatu

IRIS

April 28, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.0 earthquake in the southwest Pacific Ocean at a depth of 27 km beneath the island of Melampa in the Vanuatu island chain.

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/4113

EARTH Magazine: Making Tracks Through the Dinosaur Diamond

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/26/2016  --  Between Utah and Colorado, there is a geographical diamond in which lies a rich collection of fossils and dinosaur footprints recording the history of when dinosaurs inhabited this region. All major ages of dinosaur life are recorded here, and for more than a hundred years, paleontologists have busily been debating which dinosaurs existed based on bones and abundant dinosaur tracks, the latter of which provide clues that allow geoscientists to interpret dinosaur daily life. 

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.8 Ecuador

IRIS

April 16, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.8 earthquake that occurred near the coast of Ecuador. According to a statement from the government, more than 1,550 people were injured, 235 dead, at least 370 buildings were destroyed and another 151 buildings and 26 schools were affected by the quake.

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.0 Japan

IRIS

April 15, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on three strong to major earthquakes that occurred in Japan, including two foreshocks of M 6.2 and M 6.0 on April 14th and a M 7.0 early Saturday morning local time.  The foreshocks caused severe shaking in the region and resulted in 9 reported fatalities and more than 1000 injuries.  Early reports indicate that at least 32 people have died in the M 7.0 earthquake.

Listen Current: Pollution Melts Glaciers

Listen Current

From Listen Current, April 2016  --  The glaciers in the European Alps started melting rapidly in the 1860s. But that didn’t correspond with the warming of the European climate at the end of what is known as the Little Ice Age. That warming didn’t occur until the 1910s. To understand the causes of the glacial melt, scientists considered the possible impact of the Industrial Revolution, which began in the 1840s. The recent melting in the Rocky Mountains of America could be caused by the same reasons.

EARTH Magazine: Crippling Heat Stress Projected by Midcentury in Densely Populated Regions

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/15/2016  --  This issue, EARTH Magazine explores the world's top weather-related killer: exposure to extreme heat. Humans' response to extreme heat leads to heat stress, an illness related to the body's inability to cool itself. Humidity plays a crucial role, because as humidity increases, the ability of sweat to evaporate and cool the body decreases. 

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