Science in the News

A Year of Weather 2013

The visualization, comprised of imagery from the geostationary satellites of EUMETSAT, NOAA and the JMA, shows an entire year of weather across the globe during 2013, with commentary from Mark Higgins, Training Officer at EUMETSAT. The satellite data layer is superimposed over NASA's 'Blue Marble Next Generation' ground maps, which change with the seasons.

Grand Canyon is not so Ancient

From Nature (01/26/2014)  --  A longstanding geological fight over the age of one of the most iconic landscapes in the United States — Arizona's Grand Canyon — may finally be over. The massive chasm does not date back 70 million years, as earlier work had suggested, but was born in its entirety 5‒6 million years ago when older, shorter canyons linked together to form the complete structure.

Science and engineering of the Olympic Winter Games 2014

The National Science Foundation has partnered with NBC Learn (the educational arm of NBC News) to release the "Science and Engineering of the 2014 Olympic Winter Games"--the latest installment in the Emmy Award-winning "Science of Sports" series. This enlightening 10-part video collection, narrated by NBC Sports' Liam McHugh, delves into the physics, engineering, chemistry, design and mathematics behind the world's foremost sporting event.

NASA's Six Decades of a Warming Earth

NASA scientists say 2013 tied for the seventh warmest of any year since 1880, continuing a long-term trend of rising global temperatures. With the exception of 1998, the 10 warmest years in the 133-year record all have occurred since 2000, with 2010 and 2005 ranking as the hottest years on record.

This visualization shows how global temperatures have risen from 1950 through the end of 2013.

NASA ScienceCast - Countdown to Pluto

ScienceCasts, NASA’s new video series, offers middle and high school educators and the public a fast and fun way to learn about scientific discoveries and facts about Earth, the solar system, and beyond. The videos were produced by an astrophysicist and a team of agency narrators and videographers. The format is designed to increase understanding of the world of science through simple, clear presentations.  The videos are available in YouTube, Vimeo, and available for download.

Humans are influencing some extreme weather events, but not all

From EARTH Magazine  --  In 2012, the world experienced dozens of extreme weather events, including droughts, heat waves, cold spells, extreme rainfalls, big storms like Superstorm Sandy, and a record-low Arctic sea-ice extent. Teasing apart the factors that create extreme weather is a challenge for scientists, especially when it comes to determining whether human-induced climate change plays a role.

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