Science in the News

The IPCC climate change report - in 90 seconds

From BBC News - Scientists and politicians are gathering in Stockholm this week to await the latest report from the IPCC, the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.  The last report from the panel - which came out in 2007 - was considered so important that it led to the IPCC being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with Al Gore.  The BBC's Victoria Gill explains why this report really matters - in just 90 seconds.  Click here to access the video.

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Devastation and Recovery at Mt. St. Helens

Devastation and Recovery at Mt. St. Helens

From NASA Earth Observatory - The 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, which began with a series of small earthquakes in mid-March and peaked with a cataclysmic flank collapse, avalanche, and explosion on May 18, was not the largest nor longest-lasting eruption in the mountain’s recent history. But as the first eruption in the continental United States during the era of modern scientific observation, it was uniquely significant.

Measurements of Antarctic Ice-Shelf Melt and Models of Global Climate Change

Aerial view of a field camp on Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf.

Ability of ice shelves to regulate movement of Antarctic glaciers directly affects potential sea-level rise.

In a finding that is expected to vastly improve models of the global effects of climate change on sea-level rise, a National Science Foundation- (NSF) funded research team, working in one of Antarctica's most challenging environments, has produced the first direct measurements of how relatively warm sea water undercuts a floating ice shelf that normally retards the movement of glaciers from the Antarctic continent to the sea.

Mathematician uses skills to study Greenland's retreating glaciers

New information about glacier melting will help fine tune climate models and improve predictions for sea level rise.

Many outlet glaciers in Greenland feed ice from the land into fjords, where discharge of icebergs and melting of the glaciers by warmer ocean waters contribute to rising sea levels.

David Holland of New York University (NYU) studies what happens in the fjord when ice meets water--how the dynamics at the margin between ice and sea are changing, and what those changes could mean in the future for global sea level rise.

Historical Tsunami on the Delaware River?

Imagine the Delaware River abruptly rising toward Philadelphia in a tsunami-like wave of water. Scientists now propose that this might not be a hypothetical scenario. A newly published paper concludes that a modest (one-foot) tsunami-like event on the East Coast was generated in the past by a large offshore earthquake. This result may have potential ramifications for emergency management professionals, government officials, businesses and the general public.

Massive Underwater Shield Volcano Rivals Biggest in Solar System

The summer blockbuster movie Pacific Rim told a fanciful tale of giant monsters rising from the deep in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Now, scientists have confirmed that the northwest Pacific is home to a real-life giant of a different type: the largest single volcano yet documented on Earth - or is it?

The following articles hit the newswires, starting on September 6:

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