Science in the News

Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser has rare eruption

Yellowstone National Park's Steamboat Geyser — the world's tallest — has erupted for the first time in more than eight years. On July 31, 2013, the nine-minute blast sent steaming hot water an estimated 200 to 300 feet in the air. Unlike the park's popular and famous Old Faithful geyser, which spews water like clockwork every hour-and-a-half, no one knows when Steamboat will erupt next. In the past, it's gone as long as 50 years without a major event. In 1964, it erupted a record 29 times. The last blast came in 2005.

Daylighting Takes Off as Cities Expose Long-Buried Rivers

Daylighting Takes Off as Cities Expose Long-Buried Rivers

The latest trend in urban renewal involves opening up underground streams. There's likely an underground stream in your city, but it may soon be seeing the light. Uncovering buried streams has had huge impacts in places as diverse as Seattle, Washington, Kalamazoo, Michigan, and even Seoul, Korea—improving local water quality, providing habitat for fish and birds, and turning neglected parking lots and roads into public parks that boost neighbors' property values and can revitalize entire cities. And city planners everywhere are starting to take note.

Scientists look into Earth's "Deep Time" to predict future effects of climate change

Scientists look into Earth's "Deep Time"

Climate change alters the way in which species interact with one another--a reality that applies not just to today or to the future, but also to the past. "We found that, at all time scales, climate change can alter biotic interactions in very complex ways," said paleoecologist Jessica Blois of the University of California, Merced, the study's lead author. "If we don't incorporate this information when we're anticipating future changes, we're missing a big piece of the puzzle."

Iowa Impact Crater Confirmed

From AGI Public Relations (Alexandria, VA) - Scientists have recently confirmed the existence of an impact crater buried below the town of Decorah, Iowa. Scientists first discovered what they thought resembled a crater in 2008, but now it has been corroborated by an airborne geophysical survey. Scientists estimate the diameter of the crater at 5.5 kilometers wide, nearly five times the size of the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona.

Changing Atmosphere Affects How Much Water Trees Need

Above the forest canopy: looking down at the trees from a Michigan eddy-covariance tower.

Spurred by increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, forests over the last two decades have become dramatically more efficient in how they use water. Scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site report the results in this week's issue of the journal Nature.

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