AGI

EARTH Magazine: Redefining Homo - Does Our Family Tree Need More Branches?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, August 23, 2016  --  Human evolution and paleoanthropology are tricky subjects, not just because of the rarity of these fossils, but also because human nature seems to be getting in the way of modern taxonomy. In a field that is generally governed by logical rules when it comes to identifying new fossils, scientists are noticed there are some peculiarities applied to our own genus, Homo. 

Geoscience Currents #111: Total Employment in the Geosciences, 2014

American Geosciences Institute

With the Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2016 publication due out shortly, AGI is sharing a change to their interpretation of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data in order to estimate the size of the geoscience workforce in the United States.  The updated count of geoscientists in the workforce in 2014 includes the BLS counts of atmospheric sciences, earth sciences, marine sciences, space sciences, environmental sciences, and geography postsecondary teachers.  AGI is projecting a 10% increase in the number of employed geoscientists over the next decade.

EARTH Magazine: EARTH: Bringing Geoscience to Bear on the Problem of Abandoned Mines

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 30, 2016  --  Last summer, while the abandoned Gold King Mine in Colorado was being studied for acid mine drainage, the earthen plug blew out, releasing millions of gallons of acid mine water into the Animas River, which eventually drains into the San Juan and Colorado rivers and ultimately Lake Powell. The images were startling, but this event added momentum to the national dialog on remediating abandoned mine lands. EARTH Magazine explores the role geoscience plays in this process. 

EARTH Magazine: Seeing the Seafloor in High Definition

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 3, 2016  --  As the U.S. celebrates National Oceans Month in June, scientists who study the seafloor are excited because they believe that humans will end this century with a far better view of our seafloor than at any other time in human history. Geoscientists have been mapping land on Earth, and even other planets in our solar system, in high definition for years, but the picture of the ocean floor has remained blurry for the most part. But with advances in engineering, what lies beneath is starting to come into much better focus. 

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