AGI

EARTH Magazine: Dating of Landslides Around Oso Reveals Recurring Patterns

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 21, 2016  --  In March 2014, 43 people were killed when 7.6 million cubic meters of mud and debris violently engulfed a portion of Oso, Wash., after a period of heavy rain. The region where this occurred is characterized by impermeable clay and silt deposits, sometimes measuring more than 200 meters thick, which formed 16,000 years ago when an ice sheet covered the region. These deposits and the addition of a wet, rainy climate makes the Stillaguamish River Valley ripe for more landslides. 

EARTH: Double Trouble - Volcanic Eruption Leads to Strong Earthquake Eight Months Later

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 15, 2016  --  A 2002 eruption of  Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that killed more than 100 people also triggered an earthquake eight months later that shook the town of Kalehe in the Lake Kivu region. EARTH Magazine explores just what happened to better understand a region that is being pulled apart by plate tectonics. 

AGI Geoscience Currents #110: U.S. Female Geoscience Enrollments and Degrees Remain Level in 2015

American Geosciences Institute

From AGI  -- In Geoscience Currents #110, we examine the current state of gender diversity in U.S. geoscience programs.  Female participation rates in geoscience programs have been slightly declining to steady over the last decade, but when coupled with the strong enrollment growth, the actual number of women in geoscience programs has continued to grow briskly.  These trends have generally continued in 2015, except for a sharper decline in the percentage of women being conferred graduate degrees.

Geoscience Currents #109: U.S. Geoscience Enrollments Grow, Degrees Slide in 2015

American Geosciences Institute

From AGI  -- In Geoscience Currents #109, we take a look at the latest reported enrollments and degrees granted in U.S. Geoscience Programs.  Overall, geoscience enrollments remain robust, growing 7% for undergraduate enrollments. Graduate enrollments remained flat between 2014 and 2015.  Noticable within the reported data is the growth of wholly online geoscience degree programs, which account for more than all of the recognized enrollment growth of undergraduate majors in 2015.

EARTH Magazine: The Most Dangerous Fault in America

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 05/23/2016  --  When people think of dangerous faults in America, the the San Andreas probably comes to mind first. But another potentially greater threat lurks in the East Bay region of Northern California, just a stone's throw from San Francisco and the tech hub of Silicon Valley: the Hayward Fault. In the June issue, EARTH Magazine guest author Steven Newton lays out just what is at risk, and what to expect when an earthquake strikes on what may be the most dangerous fault in America.

EARTH Magazine: Did the Medieval Warm Period Welcome Vikings to Greenland?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 16, 2016  --  What is known: Vikings sailed to Greenland. They homesteaded there for a few hundred years, and likely experienced multiple famines. Many died. Some returned to European shores. And all of this happened during a time in Europe known to geoscientists as the Medieval Warm Period. The warmer, milder conditions that defined this time eventually ended too. 

EARTH Magazine: Growth Rings in Rocks Reveal Past Climate

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 5, 2016  --  For years, scientists have used mineral, sediment and ice layers, deposited intermittently throughout geologic time, to track the global climate record. These can come from caves, lakes, the oceans and ice sheets. But over the course of the last decade a new method has been developed that presents an opportunity for geoscientists to assess global climate history in almost any arid landscape.

EARTH Magazine: Reading the Ridges - Are Climate and the Seafloor Connected?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 2, 2016  --  EARTH Magazine plunges into the depths of the ocean with scientists seeking whether Earth's climate and sea-level history are intrinsically linked with tectonics at mid-ocean ridges. Since these ridges are not as well studied as terrestrial volcanoes, largely given the challenge to access them, teams of researchers are using tectonic models, evidence from high-resolution mapping of different spreading ridges and sediment cores to examine the evidence. 

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