atmosphere

PAESTA Podcast Series: Episode 1 - How Do We Know CO2 is Increasing?

Atmospheric CO2 at Mauna Loa Observatory

You Asked, We Answered!

Transcript for the podcast

We know that atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide have been increasing because we have the data! The story of collecting CO2 data begins in 1958, when a geochemist from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Dr. Charles Keeling, started collecting measurements of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere at an observatory located over 11,000 feet in elevation on the Mauna Loa volcano on the big island of Hawaii. These systematic measurements Dr. Keeling started have become the most widely recognized record of human impact on Earth, linking rising levels of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels to the warming of the planet.

EARTH Magazine: Rock Stars - Geologists on the Silver Screen

EARTH magazine

From EARTH magazine, 05/27/15  --  As this summer's blockbuster movie season gets underway, EARTH Magazine asks an important question: In movies, "are geologists portrayed as heroes or villains?" The topic of how geologists are portrayed in film has been oft-debated around a campfire, or over a frosty beverage at the end of a day of fieldwork, but now four scientists bring some serious analysis to the subject in the June issue feature, "Rock Stars - Geologists on the Silver Screen."

EARTH Magazine: Fire-driven Clouds and Swirling Winds Whipped Up Record-Setting New Mexico Blaze

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/13/2015  --  The massive 2011 Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos, N.M., defied conventional fire science wisdom by racing downhill instead of uphill, and increasing intensity overnight. Now, EARTH Magazine brings you recent scientific analysis of the fire from a research team at Los Alamos National Lab.

EARTH Magazine: Kamikaze Typhoons Spared Japan from Kublai Kahn

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From AGI, 03/31/2015  --  In a small lake along the Japanese coast, scientists have found evidence of turbulent waters centuries ago. These telltale signs of severe weather in the geologic record support the  legend of the two kamikaze typhoons that protected Japan from Mongol invasion. EARTH Magazine follows University of Amherst geoscientist Kinuyo Kanamaru and his research team as the dig up history in search of signs of the storms.

EARTH Magazine: El Niño Disaster Stunted Children’s Growth

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/04/2015  --  Children born during, and up to three years after, the devastating 1997-1998 El Niño event in northern Peru were found to be shorter than their peers in a new study covered in EARTH Magazine. The rising waters wiped out crops, drowned livestock, cut off bridges, and caused prolonged famine in many rural villages. Now, a new study that tracked long-term health impacts on children from the affected region has found that a decade later, the children continue to bear signs of the hardship endured early in their lives. 

EARTH: Hundreds of Methane Seeps Discovered Along the U.S. East Coast

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  Methane is often found naturally leaking from the seafloor, particularly in petroleum basins like the Gulf of Mexico or along tectonically active continental margins like the U.S. West Coast, but such plumes were not expected along passive margins, like the East Coast of North America. Now, however, the discovery of hundreds of methane seeps on the seafloor along the U.S. East Coast suggests that such reservoirs may be more common along passive margins than previously thought.

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