biosphere

EARTH: Parasites spread across the Arctic under the "new normal"

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  The last several decades have seen Arctic sea-ice minimums drop by more than half in area and more than three-quarters in volume. With current models predicting further reductions, scientists are calling it the "new normal" and are trying to grasp its implications - one of which is the occurrence of pathogens never before seen in the Arctic.

EARTH: Preserving Peru's Petrified Forest

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  Tucked high in the Andes Mountains of northern Peru is a remarkable fossil locality: a 39-million-year-old petrified forest preserved in nearly pristine condition: stumps, full trees, leaves and all. With its existence unknown to scientists until the early 1990s - and its significance unbeknownst to villagers - this ancient forest hosts the remains of more than 40 types of trees, some still rooted, that flourished in a lowland tropical forest until they were suddenly buried by a volcanic eruption during the Eocene.

AMNH's Evolution: An Online Course for Educators

American Museum of Natural History

Starting June 2, for four weeks -- How are all of the species living on Earth today related? How does understanding evolutionary science contribute to our well-being? In this course, participants will learn about evolutionary relationships, population genetics, and natural and artificial selection. Participants will explore evolutionary science and learn how to integrate it into their classrooms.

Press release for students - Ancient forests kept Earth’s climate under control

EGU Planet Press

From EGU  --  In the last 24 million years, conditions on Earth meant that there could have been very low levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere – which could have led to very cold conditions – but did not. Scientists have been asking why this was, and a team of researchers in the UK have now possibly found an answer.

Google Glass in the Gobi: Prospecting

From AMNH  --  Last summer, a team led by the Museum's Provost of Science Michael Novacek and Paleontology Division Chair Mark Norell headed to the Gobi for the joint American Museum of Natural History/Mongolian Academy of Sciences expedition. The group included Aki Watanabe, one of Mark Norell's students at the Museum's Richard Gilder Graduate School, who was recently chosen as a beta-tester for Google Glass and who recorded video on Glass throughout the trip.

Permian Mass Extinction Took 60,000 Years

From LiveScience  --  It took only 60,000 years to kill more than 90 percent of all life on Earth, according to the most precise study yet of the Permian mass extinction, the greatest die-off in the past 540 million years.  The new timeline doesn't reveal the culprit behind the die-off, though scientists have several suspects, such as volcanic eruptions in Siberia that belched massive quantities of climate-changing gases.

Pages