EARTH Magazine

EARTH: Santiaguito Volcano's Clockwork Behavior Provides an Exceptional Laboratory

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  If Earth breathes, Santiaguito Volcano in the Western Highlands of Guatemala could be its mouth. Roughly every half hour, like volcanic clockwork, Santiaguito's active Caliente lava dome expands, filling with gas from depressurizing magma below. Then it exhales, often explosively, and deflates. Over the course of a day, you could almost keep time by it.

EARTH: Virtual Water - Tracking the Unseen Water in Goods and Resources

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  "Virtual water" was coined in 1993 to help explain why long-predicted water wars driven by water and food security had not occurred among the arid nations of the Middle East and North Africa. The virtual water notion refers basically to the total amount of freshwater, either from rainfall or irrigation, used in the production of food commodities, including crops and fodder-fed livestock, or other goods and services - agricultural, industrial or otherwise.

EARTH: La Brea climate Adaptation as Different as Cats and Dogs

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  The La Brea tar pits in downtown Los Angeles are a famous predator trap. For every herbivore, a dozen or more carnivores - saber-toothed cats and dire wolves chief among them - are pulled from the prolific Pleistocene fossil site. In fact, the remains of more than 4,000 dire wolves have been excavated, along with more than 2,000 saber-toothed cats. The sheer number of fossils allows researchers to ask population-level questions about the climate and environment as well as how these animals evolved.

EARTH: Unlocking the Cascadia Subduction Zone's Secrets: Peering into Recent Research and Findings

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  The Cascadia Subduction Zone is a 1,000-kilometer-long subduction zone stretching from Mendocino, Calif., to north of Vancouver Island off the coast of British Columbia, Canada. Those living along this stretch are occasionally treated to some shaky moments by the subduction of the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath the massive North American Plate. But the real threat is a

EARTH: Parasites spread across the Arctic under the "new normal"

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  The last several decades have seen Arctic sea-ice minimums drop by more than half in area and more than three-quarters in volume. With current models predicting further reductions, scientists are calling it the "new normal" and are trying to grasp its implications - one of which is the occurrence of pathogens never before seen in the Arctic.

EARTH: Preserving Peru's Petrified Forest

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  Tucked high in the Andes Mountains of northern Peru is a remarkable fossil locality: a 39-million-year-old petrified forest preserved in nearly pristine condition: stumps, full trees, leaves and all. With its existence unknown to scientists until the early 1990s - and its significance unbeknownst to villagers - this ancient forest hosts the remains of more than 40 types of trees, some still rooted, that flourished in a lowland tropical forest until they were suddenly buried by a volcanic eruption during the Eocene.

EARTH: Staking a Claim: Deep-Sea Mining Nears Fruition

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine  --  The existence of seafloor sediments containing valuable minerals and metals has been known since the late 19th century, but it wasn't until the 1960s that the earliest attempts to recover mineral wealth from the deep sea were made. Technical challenges, as well as discoveries in the 1970s of more economical and previously unknown terrestrial mineral deposits, shelved the idea until the 1990s.

The History, Science and Poetry of New England's Stone Walls

Stone wall in Massachusetts

From EARTH Magazine  --  When author John-Manuel Andriote returned to his hometown in New England after years away, he noticed something that had been invisible to him while growing up there - the old stone walls tumbling off into the forests. The realization that the crumbling and overgrown walls meant those forests had once been cleared farm lands set Andriote on a years-long journey of discovery that highlights the intersections of geologic and human history.

Naturally occurring methane found in groundwater in New York

Water samples were taken from 66 wells across five counties in south-central New York. Credit: Paul Heisig/USGS

From EARTH Magazine  --  Since hydraulic fracturing operations began in the Marcellus Shale region, debate has raged over whether drilling operations are causing high levels of methane in drinking-water wells. But few systematic scientific studies have been published to date, so it's unknown if high methane levels are natural or the result of contamination from nearby gas wells. Now, a new study is adding some much-needed baseline data for methane levels in groundwater in New York.

Pages