hydrosphere

Global sea level rise temporarily dampened by 2010-11 Australia floods

Three atmospheric patterns came together above the Indian and Pacific Oceans in 2010 and 2011. When they did, they drove so much precipitation over Australia that the world's ocean levels dropped measurably. Unlike other continents, the soils and topography of Australia prevent almost all its precipitation from flowing into the ocean.

Cactus "flesh" cleans up toxic water

Cactus

From the National Science Foundation - A University of South Florida team are using the "flesh" from Prickly Pear cacti, called mucilage, to clean up oil and other toxins from water. The objectives of this research are to develop a water purification system based on an economically feasible method for low-income inhabitants of rural communities that are sensitive to existing economic, social and cultural patterns.

AMNH Science Bulletins: Curiosity—Searching for Carbon

The Curiosity rover is seeking environments on Mars that could support life—or could have in the past. Earlier Mars missions found signs of water, but not organic carbon—life's essential building block. Watch the Curiosity team prepare to hunt for carbon at Mount Sharp, which holds a geologic record hundreds of millions of years old.

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History.

Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser has rare eruption

Yellowstone National Park's Steamboat Geyser — the world's tallest — has erupted for the first time in more than eight years. On July 31, 2013, the nine-minute blast sent steaming hot water an estimated 200 to 300 feet in the air. Unlike the park's popular and famous Old Faithful geyser, which spews water like clockwork every hour-and-a-half, no one knows when Steamboat will erupt next. In the past, it's gone as long as 50 years without a major event. In 1964, it erupted a record 29 times. The last blast came in 2005.

Daylighting Takes Off as Cities Expose Long-Buried Rivers

Daylighting Takes Off as Cities Expose Long-Buried Rivers

The latest trend in urban renewal involves opening up underground streams. There's likely an underground stream in your city, but it may soon be seeing the light. Uncovering buried streams has had huge impacts in places as diverse as Seattle, Washington, Kalamazoo, Michigan, and even Seoul, Korea—improving local water quality, providing habitat for fish and birds, and turning neglected parking lots and roads into public parks that boost neighbors' property values and can revitalize entire cities. And city planners everywhere are starting to take note.

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