lithosphere

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.2 New Caledonia

IRIS

August 12, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a major earthquake that struck in the southwest Pacific Ocean 515.8 km (320.5 mi) southeast of Vanuatu. There were no reports of damage and no threat of a tsunami.

IRIS page: http://www.iris.edu/hq/retm/4204

EARTH: Sand Shouldn't Stand In for Volcanic Ash in Jet Engine Tests

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, August 10, 2016  --  In 2010, trans-Atlantic airspace was shutdown, and international travel halted, when Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull erupted, spewing ash into the air. This was an expensive decision, triggered by the threat ash posed to aircraft, crews and passengers. When ash enters an aircraft turbine, which typically can reach temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Celsius, the ash can melt, damaging the engines in midflight. 

EARTH Magazine: EARTH: Bringing Geoscience to Bear on the Problem of Abandoned Mines

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 30, 2016  --  Last summer, while the abandoned Gold King Mine in Colorado was being studied for acid mine drainage, the earthen plug blew out, releasing millions of gallons of acid mine water into the Animas River, which eventually drains into the San Juan and Colorado rivers and ultimately Lake Powell. The images were startling, but this event added momentum to the national dialog on remediating abandoned mine lands. EARTH Magazine explores the role geoscience plays in this process. 

EARTH Magazine: Dating of Landslides Around Oso Reveals Recurring Patterns

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 21, 2016  --  In March 2014, 43 people were killed when 7.6 million cubic meters of mud and debris violently engulfed a portion of Oso, Wash., after a period of heavy rain. The region where this occurred is characterized by impermeable clay and silt deposits, sometimes measuring more than 200 meters thick, which formed 16,000 years ago when an ice sheet covered the region. These deposits and the addition of a wet, rainy climate makes the Stillaguamish River Valley ripe for more landslides. 

EARTH: Double Trouble - Volcanic Eruption Leads to Strong Earthquake Eight Months Later

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 15, 2016  --  A 2002 eruption of  Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that killed more than 100 people also triggered an earthquake eight months later that shook the town of Kalehe in the Lake Kivu region. EARTH Magazine explores just what happened to better understand a region that is being pulled apart by plate tectonics. 

Teachable Moment from IRIS - Magnitude 7.2 South Sandwich Islands

IRIS

May 28, 2016  --  IRIS does an excellent job collecting and preparing resources we can use in our classrooms on recent, significant earthquakes. Check out their PowerPoint, visualizations and animations on a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that occurred in the South Sandwich Islands, an uninhabited British territory off the coast of Argentina in the southern Atlantic Ocean.

EARTH Magazine: The Most Dangerous Fault in America

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 05/23/2016  --  When people think of dangerous faults in America, the the San Andreas probably comes to mind first. But another potentially greater threat lurks in the East Bay region of Northern California, just a stone's throw from San Francisco and the tech hub of Silicon Valley: the Hayward Fault. In the June issue, EARTH Magazine guest author Steven Newton lays out just what is at risk, and what to expect when an earthquake strikes on what may be the most dangerous fault in America.

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