NASA

NASA's Space Place in a Snap! - Black Holes

NASA Space Place in a SNAP!

NASA's Space Place in a SNAP! is a series of quick, narrated tours of animated infographics that illustrate key science concepts. Not only are they fun and entertaining on their own, they also come with a downloadable poster and a transcript of the video, making for a cross-disciplinary learning experience. The latest topic—black holes! Find out what they are today at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/black-holes/en/ .

 

NASA’s Space Place: Old Tool, New Use: GPS and the Terrestrial Reference Frame

NASA's Space Place Logo

By Alex H. Kasprak  --  Flying over 1300 kilometers above Earth, the Jason 2 satellite knows its distance from the ocean down to a matter of centimeters, allowing for the creation of detailed maps of the ocean’s surface. This information is invaluable to oceanographers and climate scientists. By understanding the ocean’s complex topography—its barely perceptible hills and troughs—these scientists can monitor the pace of sea level rise, unravel the intricacies of ocean currents, and project the effects of future climate change.

NASA's Space Place: A Two-Toned Wonder from the Saturnian Outskirts

NASA's Space Place Logo

By Dr. Ethan Siegel  --  Although Saturn has been known as long as humans have been watching the night sky, it's only since the invention of the telescope that we've learned about the rings and moons of this giant, gaseous world. You might know that the largest of Saturn's moons is Titan, the second largest moon in the entire Solar System, discovered by Christiaan Huygens in 1655.

NASA Probe Finds Newly Formed Crater On Mars

From NPR  --  Take a close look at the image below showing a newly formed impact crater on Mars: The blue streaks of material, known as ejecta, radiate 9 miles from the 100-foot crater, according to NASA.  The picture was taken from orbit by the on Nov. 19. The same area was imaged by the MRO's Context Camera in July 2010 and again in May 2012 — with no crater in the first and a telltale surface scar in the second.

NASA's Six Decades of a Warming Earth

NASA scientists say 2013 tied for the seventh warmest of any year since 1880, continuing a long-term trend of rising global temperatures. With the exception of 1998, the 10 warmest years in the 133-year record all have occurred since 2000, with 2010 and 2005 ranking as the hottest years on record.

This visualization shows how global temperatures have risen from 1950 through the end of 2013.

NASA ScienceCast - Countdown to Pluto

ScienceCasts, NASA’s new video series, offers middle and high school educators and the public a fast and fun way to learn about scientific discoveries and facts about Earth, the solar system, and beyond. The videos were produced by an astrophysicist and a team of agency narrators and videographers. The format is designed to increase understanding of the world of science through simple, clear presentations.  The videos are available in YouTube, Vimeo, and available for download.

Want to send your name up in space on a NASA spacecraft launching in 2016?

OSIRIS-REx

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission and The Planetary Society invite you to submit your name for a round-trip ride to asteroid Bennu. Your name will hitch a ride to the asteroid, spend 500 days there, and return in the Sample Return Capsule to Earth in 2023.

Plus your name will be on the spacecraft, which will remain in space long after returning the sample return capsule to Earth.

To add your name, visit: http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/bennu/

2013 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

2013 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

Audience: Students Grades 5-12
Entry Deadline: Oct. 25, 2013

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible observations taken by Cassini and choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This year's targets are Saturn and its moons Iapetus and Dione. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

Pages