press release

EARTH Magazine: Reading the Ridges - Are Climate and the Seafloor Connected?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 2, 2016  --  EARTH Magazine plunges into the depths of the ocean with scientists seeking whether Earth's climate and sea-level history are intrinsically linked with tectonics at mid-ocean ridges. Since these ridges are not as well studied as terrestrial volcanoes, largely given the challenge to access them, teams of researchers are using tectonic models, evidence from high-resolution mapping of different spreading ridges and sediment cores to examine the evidence. 

NSF: Researchers find that Earth may be home to 1 trillion species

National Science Foundation

From NSF, May 2, 2016  --  Largest analysis of microbial data reveals that 99.999 percent of all species remain undiscovered

Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to the results of a new study.

The estimate, based on universal scaling laws applied to large datasets, appears today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The report's authors are Jay Lennon and Kenneth Locey of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

EARTH Magazine: Making Tracks Through the Dinosaur Diamond

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/26/2016  --  Between Utah and Colorado, there is a geographical diamond in which lies a rich collection of fossils and dinosaur footprints recording the history of when dinosaurs inhabited this region. All major ages of dinosaur life are recorded here, and for more than a hundred years, paleontologists have busily been debating which dinosaurs existed based on bones and abundant dinosaur tracks, the latter of which provide clues that allow geoscientists to interpret dinosaur daily life. 

EARTH Magazine: Crippling Heat Stress Projected by Midcentury in Densely Populated Regions

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/15/2016  --  This issue, EARTH Magazine explores the world's top weather-related killer: exposure to extreme heat. Humans' response to extreme heat leads to heat stress, an illness related to the body's inability to cool itself. Humidity plays a crucial role, because as humidity increases, the ability of sweat to evaporate and cool the body decreases. 

EARTH Magazine: Where Fire Freezes - All Eyes, Ears and Instruments on Iceland’s Volatile Volcanoes

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/31/2016  --  Iceland is located in the North Atlantic straddling a mid-ocean ridge and possibly riding over a Hawaiian-style hot spot. This makes it is a prime geological environment for volcanoes: Iceland has more than 100 volcanoes, 33 of which are active. Iceland is also home to examples of every type of volcano on Earth, each with its own eruptive pattern. Thus, the island nation presents a special challenge to volcanologists as well as serving as an ideal natural laboratory for studying how volcanic processes evolve.

EARTH Magazine: A Long Layover on the Bering Land Bridge

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/24/2016  --  In 2013, researchers uncovered the graves of two infants laid to rest about 11,500 years ago outside of what is now Fairbanks, Alaska. Researchers understood that these graves represented some of the earliest human migrants to North America, but were they more closely related to their Asian ancestors, or the modern-day residents of North and South America? Using mitochondrial DNA analysis of the infants, what could we learn about our own human history? 

EARTH Magazine: Protracted Drought Threatens California Levees

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/18/2016  --  We're most accustomed to flooding causing levees to fail, like they did in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. So although the El Nino-induced floods are making the most news in California right now, it's not actually the floods that are threatening some California levees the most. Instead it's the severe drought over the last four years that has taken its toll on thousands of kilometers of century-old earthen levees. 

EARTH Magazine: Hidden Double Earthquakes Spells Trouble for Tsunami Warning Systems

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/08/2016  --  A magnitude-7.1 earthquake struck Chile on Jan. 2, 2011, or so scientists thought. Now, with increasing sensor sensitivity and advances in the quantitative analysis of earthquakes, scientists have revealed that this quake was actually a doublet. This meant that instead of just one massive quake, two similarly large earthquakes struck very near to one another within seconds. 

EARTH Magazine: Urban Geology - An Emerging Discipline in an Increasingly Urbanized World

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 03/01/2016  --  More than half of the total human population on Earth lives in urban areas, where, like rural areas, geology affects us every day. Yet when we think about "geology," most of us think of the hinterlands. That needs to change, argue the authors of a new feature in EARTH Magazine discussing what the role of urban geology is, what it can be and the potential role geoscience organizations can play in curating the geologic data revealed during construction, excavations and surveys.

EARTH Magazine: Slipping Point - Snow Scientists Dig In to Decipher Avalanche Triggers

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 02/22/2016  --  As skiers hit the slopes this winter, EARTH Magazine explores the science of how to keep them and other winter explorers safe. Every year, hundreds of people are killed by avalanches. Understanding the science of the frozen environment is only part of this story; communicating the risk is a field as dynamic as the weather systems and terrains that foster avalanches.

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