AGI press release

Geoscience Policy Recommendations for the New Administration and the 115th Congress

Geoscience Policy Recommendations for the New Administration and the 115th Congress

From AGI, March 20, 2017, see webpage of press release (link is external)  --  Geoscientists gather and interpret data about the Earth and other planets, providing the data, tools, and expertise to help solve some of America’s greatest challenges. The policy proposals laid out in this document are centered around five high-level thematic areas:

New Geoscience Student Exit Survey Reflects Evolving Opportunities for Recent Graduates

AGI Press Release

From AGI  -- The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) Workforce Program announces the release of its annual Status of Recent Geoscience Graduates report. The report details the results of the 2016 Geoscience Student Exit Survey, documenting trends trends in geoscience coursework, enrollment, student experiences, as well as a recent shift in hiring patterns for new graduates.

EARTH Magazine: An App That Brings Home Your Seismic Hazard

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, January 31, 2017  --  Do you know the earthquake risk in your neighborhood? If not, that information is now available in the palm of your hand. Founded by two former U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees, Temblor is a free app that allows people to view interactive seismic hazard maps on their smartphones, tablets or computers. It also teaches U.S. homeowners to factor earthquake and landslide risk into their financial decisions, like where to live and what insurance to buy.

EARTH Magazine: Harmful Algal Blooms Find New Habitats in Changing Oceans

EARTH Magazine

From AGI, January 19, 2017  --  In April and May 2015, a bloom of toxic algae spanned more than a thousand miles of Pacific coastline, from Santa Barbara, Calif., to British Columbia. Marine organisms were poisoned throughout the food web, disrupting coastal ecosystems and economies for months. Similar events are expected to become more frequent as the oceans and atmosphere adjust to a warming climate.

EARTH Magazine: The First Americans: How and When Were the Americas Populated?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, January 4, 2017  --  The latest research suggests humans first arrived in the Americas as early as 16,000 years ago, but using which path — along the Pacific coast, through an inland ice-free corridor, or from the East along the Atlantic coast — remains controversial. Archaeologists and geologists are working to try to answer the question of how and when the first Americans arrived. In the January issue of EARTH Magazine, their work is showcased, reexamining the origins of our shared geoheritage in light of new evidence.

Earth Science Week 2017 Theme Announced: 'Earth and Human Activity'

Earth Science Week

From AGI Public Relations, January 3, 2017  --  The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to announce that the theme of Earth Science Week 2017 is "Earth and Human Activity." This year's event, the 20th annual Earth Science Week celebration (Oct. 8-14), promotes awareness of what geoscience tells us about human interaction with the planet's natural systems and processes.
 

Bipartisan Coalition of Senators Endorses Earth Science Week 2016

AGI Press Release

From AGI, October 13, 2016  --  In a positive display of bipartisanship, U.S. Senators from across the country have come together in support of the American Geosciences Institute's 19th annual Earth Science Week celebration. The coalition, which consists of Members of Congress from Alaska to Florida, formally introduced a Senate resolution officially designating the week of October 9, 2016 through October 15, 2016 as "Earth Science Week." 

EARTH Magazine: Redefining Homo - Does Our Family Tree Need More Branches?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, August 23, 2016  --  Human evolution and paleoanthropology are tricky subjects, not just because of the rarity of these fossils, but also because human nature seems to be getting in the way of modern taxonomy. In a field that is generally governed by logical rules when it comes to identifying new fossils, scientists are noticed there are some peculiarities applied to our own genus, Homo. 

Pages