atmosphere

EARTH Magazine: Crippling Heat Stress Projected by Midcentury in Densely Populated Regions

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 04/15/2016  --  This issue, EARTH Magazine explores the world's top weather-related killer: exposure to extreme heat. Humans' response to extreme heat leads to heat stress, an illness related to the body's inability to cool itself. Humidity plays a crucial role, because as humidity increases, the ability of sweat to evaporate and cool the body decreases. 

February 2016 Edition of the Pennsylvania Observer (PA weather/climate information)

The Pennsylvania State Climatologist

From The Pennsylvania Climate Office Staff  -- The February 2016 edition of the "Pennsylvania Observer" is attached.  Features include a summary of February's weather, the experimental forecast for March and April, and one highlight. The highlight covers the basics of understanding the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Look for the next newsletter at the start of April.

EARTH Magazine: Slipping Point - Snow Scientists Dig In to Decipher Avalanche Triggers

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 02/22/2016  --  As skiers hit the slopes this winter, EARTH Magazine explores the science of how to keep them and other winter explorers safe. Every year, hundreds of people are killed by avalanches. Understanding the science of the frozen environment is only part of this story; communicating the risk is a field as dynamic as the weather systems and terrains that foster avalanches.

January 2016 Edition of the Pennsylvania Observer (PA weather/climate information)

From The Pennsylvania Climate Office Staff  -- The January 2016 edition of the "Pennsylvania Observer" is attached.  Features include a summary of January's weather, the experimental forecast for February and March, and one highlight. The highlight covers the basics of understanding two teleconnection patterns - the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation.

EARTH Magazine: Lake Sediments Suggest Mild Volcanic Winter After Massive Toba Eruption

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 01/15/2016  -- Toba volcano erupted 74,000 years ago, and is thought to have been the largest eruption in the last 2.5 million years. Some scientists have thought the fallout from the eruption caused a volcanic winter so catastrophic it almost drove humans to extinction. A new high-resolution study of lake sediments from East Africa disputes that idea, however, suggesting that the early humans in the area probably experienced little or no cooling following the massive eruption.

December 2015 Edition of the Pennsylvania Observer (PA weather/climate information)

The Pennsylvania State Climatologist

From The Pennsylvania Climate Office Staff  -- The December 2015 edition of the "Pennsylvania Observer" is attached.  Features include a summary of December's weather, the experimental forecast for January and February, and one highlight. The highlight covers the basics of understanding the El Nino Southern Oscillation.

 

 

November 2015 Edition of the Pennsylvania Observer (PA weather/climate information)

The Pennsylvania State Climatologist

From The Pennsylvania Climate Office Staff  --  The November 2015 edition of the "Pennsylvania Observer" is attached.  Features include a summary of November's weather, the experimental forecast for December and January, and one highlight. The highlight shows the relationship between a warm November and the following December-February snowfall for select sites across Pennsylvania. Look for the next newsletter at the start of January.

Listen Current: Climate Change Summit

Listen Current

November 29, 2015  --  This week the United Nations Conference on Climate Change begins in Paris, France. This is an annual meeting of all countries that want to work together to improve the climate. To help discuss this with your students, Listen Current has highlighted their resources about climate change.

Access the audio file and lesson plans at the Listen Current website (you can register for a free account to access all these teaching materials and more):

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