cryosphere

EARTH Magazine: Early Spring Thaw Triggers Arctic Greenhouse Gas Release

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine (AGI), March 20, 2017  --  The Arctic looks pretty inactive during the winter, but more may be happening than meets the eye.  According to a recent study, some carbon dioxide and methane are released during the early spring thaw, suggesting that critical processes are taking place during the Arctic winter. 

2016 Project Polar Bear :Youth Climate Contest for Environmental Educators and Science Teachers

Polar Bears International

From Project Polar Bear  --  Every year Project Polar Bear (link is external) challenges student groups across the globe to take action on climate change. With the guidance of an advisor, middle and high school groups compete for a grant by creating a plan for a project that will help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and engage their communities.

Press release for students - Studying glaciers with animated satellite images

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, November 26, 2015  --  Frank Paul, a scientist from the University of Zurich in Switzerland, has come up with a simple method to allow us to see glacier movements and changes, using the Karakoram mountain range in central Asia as an example. He created GIF animations from satellite images of the region.

Listen Current: Pollution Melts Glaciers

Listen Current

From Listen Current, April 2016  --  The glaciers in the European Alps started melting rapidly in the 1860s. But that didn’t correspond with the warming of the European climate at the end of what is known as the Little Ice Age. That warming didn’t occur until the 1910s. To understand the causes of the glacial melt, scientists considered the possible impact of the Industrial Revolution, which began in the 1840s. The recent melting in the Rocky Mountains of America could be caused by the same reasons.

EARTH Magazine: Slipping Point - Snow Scientists Dig In to Decipher Avalanche Triggers

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 02/22/2016  --  As skiers hit the slopes this winter, EARTH Magazine explores the science of how to keep them and other winter explorers safe. Every year, hundreds of people are killed by avalanches. Understanding the science of the frozen environment is only part of this story; communicating the risk is a field as dynamic as the weather systems and terrains that foster avalanches.

Press release for students - Hair ice mystery solved

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, 07/22/2015  --  Did you know that there is a type of ice called hair ice? It is shaped like fine, silky hairs and looks like white candy floss. It grows on the rotten branches of broad-leaf trees during humid winter nights when the air temperature drops slightly below 0°C. A 100-year old theory states that hair ice also needs something else to grow – a fungus – but, until now, no one had managed to confirm this.

EARTH Magazine: Endangered Icebreakers: The Future of Arctic Research, Exploration and Rescue at Risk

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, 07/28/2015  --  The United States' Icebreaker Fleet - operated by the U.S. Coast Guard - consists of just two ships that are used for everything from search and rescue to national security operations to scientific research. In our August cover story, EARTH Magazine examines the various roles icebreakers play, especially in Arctic research, and how insufficient funding is affecting the icebreakers' roles.

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