EARTH Magazine

EARTH Magazine: Early Spring Thaw Triggers Arctic Greenhouse Gas Release

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine (AGI), March 20, 2017  --  The Arctic looks pretty inactive during the winter, but more may be happening than meets the eye.  According to a recent study, some carbon dioxide and methane are released during the early spring thaw, suggesting that critical processes are taking place during the Arctic winter. 

EARTH Magazine: An App That Brings Home Your Seismic Hazard

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, January 31, 2017  --  Do you know the earthquake risk in your neighborhood? If not, that information is now available in the palm of your hand. Founded by two former U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees, Temblor is a free app that allows people to view interactive seismic hazard maps on their smartphones, tablets or computers. It also teaches U.S. homeowners to factor earthquake and landslide risk into their financial decisions, like where to live and what insurance to buy.

EARTH Magazine: Harmful Algal Blooms Find New Habitats in Changing Oceans

EARTH Magazine

From AGI, January 19, 2017  --  In April and May 2015, a bloom of toxic algae spanned more than a thousand miles of Pacific coastline, from Santa Barbara, Calif., to British Columbia. Marine organisms were poisoned throughout the food web, disrupting coastal ecosystems and economies for months. Similar events are expected to become more frequent as the oceans and atmosphere adjust to a warming climate.

EARTH Magazine: The First Americans: How and When Were the Americas Populated?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, January 4, 2017  --  The latest research suggests humans first arrived in the Americas as early as 16,000 years ago, but using which path — along the Pacific coast, through an inland ice-free corridor, or from the East along the Atlantic coast — remains controversial. Archaeologists and geologists are working to try to answer the question of how and when the first Americans arrived. In the January issue of EARTH Magazine, their work is showcased, reexamining the origins of our shared geoheritage in light of new evidence.

EARTH Magazine: When Earth Hit the Reset Button on Life

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, November 3, 2016  --  The Permian-Triassic extinction event wiped out 96% of all marine life and at least 75% of terrestrial life. It is the largest of the "Big Five" extinction events in Earth history, and it defined the boundary between the Paleozoic and the Mesozoic geologic eras. EARTH Magazine explores new research on the "P-T" mass extinction to look at what caused it, and how it can inform our understanding of today's ongoing extinction event. 

EARTH Magazine: Humans, Megafauna Coexisted in Patagonia before Extinction

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, October 12, 2016  --  As we celebrate National Fossil Day, EARTH Magazine brings you a story set in Pleistocene South America, where the climate was warming following an ice age. At this time, Patagonia was home to large megafauna species like giant sloths and saber-toothed cats. There was also a new predator on the block: humans. At some point as the climate warmed and human settlers began hunting, the megafauna living in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego went extinct. 

EARTH Magazine: Redefining Homo - Does Our Family Tree Need More Branches?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, August 23, 2016  --  Human evolution and paleoanthropology are tricky subjects, not just because of the rarity of these fossils, but also because human nature seems to be getting in the way of modern taxonomy. In a field that is generally governed by logical rules when it comes to identifying new fossils, scientists are noticed there are some peculiarities applied to our own genus, Homo. 

EARTH Magazine: EARTH: Bringing Geoscience to Bear on the Problem of Abandoned Mines

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH magazine, June 30, 2016  --  Last summer, while the abandoned Gold King Mine in Colorado was being studied for acid mine drainage, the earthen plug blew out, releasing millions of gallons of acid mine water into the Animas River, which eventually drains into the San Juan and Colorado rivers and ultimately Lake Powell. The images were startling, but this event added momentum to the national dialog on remediating abandoned mine lands. EARTH Magazine explores the role geoscience plays in this process. 

EARTH Magazine: Seeing the Seafloor in High Definition

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 3, 2016  --  As the U.S. celebrates National Oceans Month in June, scientists who study the seafloor are excited because they believe that humans will end this century with a far better view of our seafloor than at any other time in human history. Geoscientists have been mapping land on Earth, and even other planets in our solar system, in high definition for years, but the picture of the ocean floor has remained blurry for the most part. But with advances in engineering, what lies beneath is starting to come into much better focus. 

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