hydrosphere

Press release for students - Half a degree makes a world of difference

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, April 21, 2016  --  The climate of our planet is changing, and the Earth is warming up. World leaders have discussed whether we should limit the average temperature increase in our planet to 1.5°C or 2°C. There’s only half a degree of difference between these two temperature limits, but scientists have now discovered that they would each have very different consequences for our planet.

EARTH Magazine: Seeing the Seafloor in High Definition

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 3, 2016  --  As the U.S. celebrates National Oceans Month in June, scientists who study the seafloor are excited because they believe that humans will end this century with a far better view of our seafloor than at any other time in human history. Geoscientists have been mapping land on Earth, and even other planets in our solar system, in high definition for years, but the picture of the ocean floor has remained blurry for the most part. But with advances in engineering, what lies beneath is starting to come into much better focus. 

EARTH Magazine: Dating of Landslides Around Oso Reveals Recurring Patterns

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, June 21, 2016  --  In March 2014, 43 people were killed when 7.6 million cubic meters of mud and debris violently engulfed a portion of Oso, Wash., after a period of heavy rain. The region where this occurred is characterized by impermeable clay and silt deposits, sometimes measuring more than 200 meters thick, which formed 16,000 years ago when an ice sheet covered the region. These deposits and the addition of a wet, rainy climate makes the Stillaguamish River Valley ripe for more landslides. 

EARTH Magazine: Did the Medieval Warm Period Welcome Vikings to Greenland?

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 16, 2016  --  What is known: Vikings sailed to Greenland. They homesteaded there for a few hundred years, and likely experienced multiple famines. Many died. Some returned to European shores. And all of this happened during a time in Europe known to geoscientists as the Medieval Warm Period. The warmer, milder conditions that defined this time eventually ended too. 

Press release for students - Studying glaciers with animated satellite images

EGU Planet Press

From EGU, November 26, 2015  --  Frank Paul, a scientist from the University of Zurich in Switzerland, has come up with a simple method to allow us to see glacier movements and changes, using the Karakoram mountain range in central Asia as an example. He created GIF animations from satellite images of the region.

EARTH Magazine: Growth Rings in Rocks Reveal Past Climate

EARTH Magazine

From EARTH Magazine, May 5, 2016  --  For years, scientists have used mineral, sediment and ice layers, deposited intermittently throughout geologic time, to track the global climate record. These can come from caves, lakes, the oceans and ice sheets. But over the course of the last decade a new method has been developed that presents an opportunity for geoscientists to assess global climate history in almost any arid landscape.

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